Georgia to increase commercial vehicle enforcement by 25 percent

By Tyson Fisher, Land Line staff writer | Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Gov. Nathan Deal has recently announced his plan to add 60 commercial vehicle enforcement officers to the Georgia highways. Funding will be provided by the Georgia Department of Public Safety and the Georgia Ports Authority.

Currently, there are 234 commercial vehicle enforcement officers in 10 regions in the state of Georgia. Additional officers will be patrolling segments of highways that the Department of Public Safety has deemed as “high crash corridors.” Areas include Interstate 16 and I-95, the Atlanta metro area, and the area south of Atlanta along I-85.

According to a press release, the following safety measures will also be implemented:

  • The Georgia Targeting Aggressive Cars and Trucks Program; Operation Safe Drive on 95 – a joint operation between Georgia officers and their commercial vehicle enforcement counterparts in surrounding states;
  • Just Pull’em Over – an enforcement campaign involving local agencies through the traffic enforcement networks with the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety;
  • Ongoing partnerships with the Georgia Motor Trucking Association and the Georgia Motorcoach Operators Association;
  • Compliance reviews and safety audits on Georgia-based carriers by MCCD officers; and
  • Concentrated patrols to enforce speeding, distracted driving and safety belt violations and to conduct Level 3 inspections. A Level 3 inspection includes examination of the driver’s license, medical examiner’s certificate, pre-trip inspection, driver’s record-of-duty status, hours of service, seat belt and hazardous materials/dangerous goods requirements.


A 2010 Centers for Disease Control study revealed that Georgia ranked fourth among states with the highest medical and work loss costs due to deaths from crashes, behind California, Texas and Florida, the three most populous states. Crash-related death costs in Georgia for 2005 totaled $1.55 billion.

The latest National Highway Traffic Safety Administration numbers show that Georgia had the seventh most traffic fatalities in the United States in 2013, down from sixth most fatalities in 2012. Nearly 15 percent of 2013 fatal crashes in Georgia occurred on an interstate. According to the 2010 U.S. census, Georgia is the eighth most populated state. Adjusted to fatalities per 100,000 people, Georgia ranked at 23rd most fatalities.

The governor made the announcement alongside Interstate16 west of Savannah where 10 people died in two truck-related accidents this spring.

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