OOIDA ELECTION REPORT Voters weigh in on transportation issues

By Keith Goble, Land Line state legislative editor | Monday, November 10, 2014

On Nov. 4, voters in states around the country had their say on various transportation-related initiatives. Land Line tracked 250 measures overall covering statewide, county and local ballot initiatives. Here is a state-by-state breakdown of how many of those initiatives fared on ballots.

Arizona
Proposition 403: Coconino County
Whether to authorize creation of a three-tenths-cent sales tax to pay for road maintenance and equipment for the next 20 years. It is estimated to raise $7 million annually.
PASSED

Question 406: Flagstaff
Whether to increase the city sales tax by one-third-cent for 20 years to benefit projects that include street repairs. It is estimated to raise $5.3 million annually.
PASSED

Proposition 408: Sierra Vista
Whether to ban the use of red-light and speed cameras within the city. The city’s contract with Redflex to operate the cameras would terminate without penalty.
PASSED

California
Measure BB: Alameda County
Whether to double the one-half cent transportation sales tax. The 30-year, $7.8 billion initiative would be used to fix potholes, improve roads and freeways, and expand public transit throughout the county.
PASSED

Measure M: El Dorado County
Whether to continue the ban on building new subdivisions if Caltrans determines that any county stretch of Highway 50 west of the city of Placerville would experience increased congestion during peak traffic times. The restriction would remain in place until highway traffic levels are improved.
FAILED

Measure N: El Dorado County
Whether to extend through 2025 provisions that require developers to pay for needed improvements along Highway 50. The requirement is set to sunset in 2018.
FAILED

Measure H: San Benito County
Whether to renew fees to cover the county’s abandoned vehicle abatement program. The program charges $1 for personal vehicles and $2 for large trucks to help pay to remove and dispose of abandoned, wrecked or broken-down vehicles from public and private property.
PASSED

Measure E: Atascadero
An advisory question about whether to increase the sales tax by 0.5 percent for road repairs and maintenance. It is estimated to raise $1.7 million annually.
PASSED

Measure Y: Artesia
Whether to impose a general purpose utility user tax of 4.9 percent with the revenue designated for projects that include road and street work.
FAILED

Measure C: Benicia
Whether to authorize a 1-cent sales tax increase to benefit projects that include repairing 250 damaged sections of roads throughout the city.
PASSED

Measure Q: Concord
Whether to extend a half-cent sales tax for nine years for projects that include street and pothole repairs.
PASSED

Measure P: Costa Mesa
Gauge whether voters would support a state proposal for new toll lanes on a stretch of the 405 Freeway. It is an advisory question only.
FAILED

Measure R: Del Rey Oaks
Whether to increase the sales tax by 0.5 percent for “general governmental purposes” that include street repairs.
PASSED

Measure K: Gonzales
Whether to create a 10-year, 0.5 percent sales tax for “essential services,” which include street repairs.
PASSED

Measure O: Half Moon Bay
Whether to renew a half-cent sales tax for projects that include street improvements for three more years.
FAILED

Measure E: Marina
Whether to make permanent a 12 percent hotel room tax, up from 10 percent. A portion of the revenue would be used for street repair.
PASSED

Measure F: Marina
Whether to extend the 1 percent transactions and use tax for 12 years. Revenue would continue to be applied for general city services, including street maintenance.
PASSED

Measure P: Monterey
Whether to add a 1 percent sales tax for four years for improvements that include fixing streets and potholes.
PASSED

Measure C: Paradise
Whether to raise additional revenue for such services as street maintenance through a one-half percent sales tax for six years.
PASSED

Measure S: Pinole
Whether to enact a half-cent sales tax to benefit projects that include street repairs.
PASSED

Measure I: Placerville
Whether to increase the local sales tax by 0.5 percent for 10 years. At least 75 percent of the estimated $1.8 million raised each year would be used for local roads.
PASSED

Measure K: Placerville
Whether to bar the city from constructing roundabouts, traffic circles or other “similar traffic features” without first getting voter approval.
PASSED

Measure M: Port Hueneme
Whether to impose a business tax to pay for general city services that include street maintenance.
FAILED

Measure U: Richmond
Whether to impose a half-cent sales tax to mostly pay for street paving. The increase would raise $7 million annually.
PASSED

Measure G: Salinas
Whether to enact a 1 percent sales tax to boost city services and facilities. An estimated $20 million annually in tax revenue would benefit pothole and street repairs.
PASSED

Measure H: Salinas
Whether to change the city’s utility users tax to benefit “essential city services,” which include street repairs and maintenance.
PASSED

Proposition A: San Francisco
Whether to authorize a $500 million transportation infrastructure bond backed by property taxes to benefit transit.
PASSED

Proposition B: San Francisco
Whether to amend the city charter to require the city to increase the base contribution to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency by a percentage equal to the city’s annual population increase.
PASSED

Proposition L: San Francisco
Whether to establish a citywide policy for parking meter and traffic laws. Parking meter fees would be prohibited on Sundays and holidays. Charging fees between 6 p.m. and 9 a.m. would also be forbidden. Also, parking garage, meter or ticket rates would remain unchanged for at least five years.
FAILED

Measure F: Santa Paula
Would charge a 1 percent sales tax to fund services that include street repair and maintenance.
FAILED

Measure O: Sausalito
Would enact a half-cent sales tax for 10 years. A portion of the revenue would be used for street maintenance and pothole repairs.
PASSED

Measure I: Soledad
Would extend collection of the 1 percent sales tax for 15 years to help pay for “essential services” that include street maintenance.
PASSED

Measure F: Tehachapi
Whether to authorize a one-half cent sales tax for road maintenance for 10 years. It is estimated to raise $1.4 million annually.
FAILED

Measure B: Turlock
Would raise the sales tax by one-half cent over seven years to solely benefit roads. It is estimated to raise $39.2 million to repair about 330 lane miles of roads before it sunsets in 2021.
PASSED

Measure JJ: Union
Would continue collection of a one-half-cent sales tax for 10 years for general purposes in the city, including road work. It is scheduled to expire next April.
PASSED

Measure J: Weed
Would increase the city’s sales tax by 0.25 percent for such purposes as street maintenance.
PASSED

Colorado
Question 1A: Boulder County
Whether to increase the sales and use tax by 0.185 percent to pay for recovery from the 2013 flood. It is estimated to raise $9.8 million annually through 2019. The revenue would be used to repair damaged county roads and bridges.
PASSED

Question 2B: Aurora
Whether to continue collection of a 1.685-mill levy to pay for about $75 million in construction, maintenance and repairs to transportation infrastructure during the next 15 years.
FAILED

Question 2A: Bayfield
Whether to increase the local sales tax rate by 1 percent. It is estimated to raise $285,000 annually for street, traffic and transportation purposes.
FAILED

Question 2B: Idaho Springs
Whether to increase the city’s sales tax by 1 percent. It is estimated to raise $471,000 in the first year for street improvements, paving, street draining improvements, minor street repairs, pothole patching and street lighting.
PASSED

Initiative 2A: Longmont
Whether to extend a three-fourths-cent sales and use tax for street work for 10 years. It is scheduled to sunset in 2016. It is estimated to raise $12 million annually.
PASSED

Question 2F: Red Cliff
Whether to increase the local tax rate by as much as 6.122 mills for five years to pay for road and street light maintenance. It is estimated to raise $20,083 in the first year.
FAILED

Question 2A: Wheat Ridge
Whether to increase the sales and use tax by 1 percent to raise revenue for projects that include road and bridge repairs. It is estimated to raise $6.4 million annually. Another $40 million would be raised through bonding.
FAILED

Florida
Question 1: Alachua County
Whether to raise the local sales tax by 1 cent for eight years. The revenue would be used to fund about $30 million a year in road and transit work throughout the county. Specifically, the county would claim about $13 million annually with 95 percent being used for road projects. The county’s nine municipalities would split the rest.
PASSED

Question 1: Pinellas County
Whether to increase the county’s sales tax by 1 cent to expand bus service and build a light rail system linking St. Petersburg and Clearwater. It is estimated to raise $135 million annually.
FAILED

Question 1: Polk County
Whether to authorize a 1-cent sales tax increase to benefit roads and transit. It is estimated the penny increase would raise $64 million annually.
FAILED

Georgia
Question 1: Cobb County
Whether to renew a one-cent sales tax for transportation projects and transit. It is estimated to raise $750 million annually.
PASSED

Referendum 1: Forsyth County
Whether to authorize the use of bonds for work on roads, streets and bridges throughout the county. It is estimated to raise $200 million.
PASSED

Iowa
Measure E: Johnson County
Whether to raise the local option sales tax by 1 cent for 10 years for projects that include transportation work. The increase is estimated to raise up to $20 million annually countywide.
FAILED

Kansas
Question 1: Wichita
Whether to impose a one-cent local sales tax for the next five years to fund city projects that include road repairs. Nearly $28 million would be used for street maintenance and repairs. Another $40 million would go for expanding Wichita’s transit and bus service.
FAILED

Louisiana
Amendment 4: Statewide
Whether to amend the state’s constitution to allow for the investment of public funds into a yet-to-be-created transportation infrastructure bank. In addition, it would set up a revolving loan program for municipalities to borrow for road improvements.
FAILED

Maryland
Question 1: Statewide
Whether to amend the state constitution to create a “lockbox” to secure revenue from fuel taxes, vehicles sales tax and registration fees, and transit fees for transportation purposes.
PASSED

Massachusetts
Question 1: Statewide
Would reverse a state law that ties the state’s fuel tax rate to inflation, which allows for regular increases.
PASSED

Minnesota
Question 1: St. Augusta, St. Cloud, St. Joseph, Sauk Rapids and Waite Park
Whether to extend a 0.5 percent local sales tax to benefit projects that include road work through 2038. It is estimated to raise $291 million over the next 20 years.
PASSED

Missouri
Question 1: St. Charles County
Would prohibit law enforcement throughout the county, including city police departments, from using photo enforcement to issue citations.
PASSED

North Carolina
Question 1: Wilmington
Would authorize a $55 million transportation bond to benefit projects that include road work. However, only $44 million would be borrowed. The rest would come from existing funds.
PASSED

Ohio
Question 1: Guernsey County
Whether to continue a 1.5-mill levy to benefit streets, roads and bridges.
FAILED

Question 3: Guernsey County
Would raise the annual motor vehicle license tax by $5 per vehicle to pay for road maintenance.
FAILED

Issue 35: Cleveland
Would effectively end the use of red-light and speed cameras. Police officers would be required to be present at camera sites to witness violations and pull over offenders.
PASSED

Issue 99: Maple Heights
Would effectively end the use of red-light and speed cameras. Police officers would be required to witness violations at camera sites and issue tickets themselves.
PASSED

Question 1: New Carlisle
Whether to authorize a five-year, 0.5 percent income tax increase to benefit street work.
FAILED

Question 2: Springfield
Whether to authorize a five-year, 0.25 percent income tax increase to raise about $3.75 million annually for road repairs.
FAILED

Issue 23: Upper Arlington
Whether to increase the municipal income tax by 0.5 percent for projects that include street repairs. It is estimated to raise $3.5 million annually.
PASSED

Oklahoma
Proposition 1: Moore
Whether to authorize the use of bonds to pay for an Interstate 35 overpass bridge. The $15 million bond would pay for a bridge at SW 34th Street.
PASSED

Proposition 2: Moore
Whether to renew a four-year, 0.5 percent sales tax for road improvements and public safety. Local roads would continue to receive 80 percent of the tax money through 2019. It is estimated to raise $12.5 million annually.
PASSED

Oregon
Measure 88: Statewide
Whether to overturn a 2013 state law to make four-year personal driver licenses available to residents unable to prove they are in the country legally.
PASSED

Measure 221: Washington County
Whether to change a $30 annual fee, in addition to state registration and fuel taxes, to maintain existing county roads. Proceeds would be divided between the county and cities. It is estimated to raise $12.8 million annually.
FAILED

Measure 224: Florence
Whether to increase the fuel tax by 3 cents per gallon from November through February and 5 cents per gallon from March through October.
FAILED

Rhode Island
Question 6: Statewide
Whether to authorize borrowing $35 million to move forward with a variety of upgrades that include repairs to the Providence train station, expanded bus service on popular routes and better links between the city’s airport and train station.
PASSED

South Carolina
Question 1: Berkeley County
Whether to extend collection of a 1-cent sales tax for another seven years to fix intersections, road widening and resurfacing. The existing tax is scheduled to end next spring.
PASSED

South Carolina
Ordinance 9: Lexington County
Whether to authorize a 1-cent sales and use tax and a general obligation bond for transportation infrastructure. It is estimated to raise $268 million.
FAILED

Texas
Proposition 1: Statewide
Would authorize rerouting half of the state’s oil and gas severance tax revenue from the state’s Rainy Day Fund to the state highway fund. It is estimated to amount to $1.4 billion in the first year.
PASSED

Proposition 1: Austin
Whether to authorize spending $1 million to improve roads and rail. Bonds would be used to spend $400 million on road work, including upgrades along Interstate 35. The remaining $600 million would be set aside for a nine-mile rail line through the city center. However, the project is dependent on the city receiving matching federal funds.
FAILED

Proposition 1: Pflugerville
Would authorize the use of $28 million in bonds to pay for eight road projects throughout the community.
PASSED

Virginia
Question 1: Fairfax County
Would authorize a $100 million bond referendum to help finance $1.4 billion in transportation projects during the next six years.
PASSED

Washington
Advisory Vote 1: Clark County
An advisory question about whether a private firm should build a toll-free east county bridge that would carry two lanes of traffic each way over the Columbia River. Two covered lanes would also be built for bicycles and pedestrians.
PASSED

Proposition 1: Ferndale
Whether to impose a 1-cent tax on fuel purchases at fuel stops within the city. Additional revenue would be earmarked for road construction and maintenance. The first 60,000 gallons sold at fuel stations each month would be exempted from collection of the penny tax. It is estimated to raise $178,000 annually.
FAILED

Proposition 1: Friday Harbor
Whether to impose a 0.2 percent sales tax for 10 years to help pay for transportation improvements.
PASSED

Proposition 1: Lynnwood
Whether to authorize a sales and use tax of 0.2 percent to be collected in the area for 10 years to fund transportation improvements.
FAILED

Proposition 1: Seattle
Whether to authorize an additional vehicle license fee of $60 per registered vehicle and a 0.1-cent sales and use tax to fund metro transit service. It is estimated to raise $45 million annually.
PASSED

Citizen Petition 1: Seattle
Whether to add a $5 relicensing tab fee on vehicles registered within the city to support the creation of a city transportation authority to plan, build, operate and maintain monorail facilities. It is estimated to raise $2 million annually.
FAILED

Proposition 1: Spokane
Whether to extend the current property tax assessments to raise $25 million annually for street repairs.
PASSED

Wisconsin
Question 1: Statewide
Whether to require all fuel tax and vehicle fee revenue to be used only for the state’s transportation system.
PASSED

Copyright © OOIDA

Comments