Cummins ready for California APU and EPA emission requirements

| Monday, September 24, 2007

NASHVILLE, TNAt a press conference just before the fall meeting of the Technology & Maintenance Council here, Cummins Inc. officials announced that their on-highway diesel engines produced after Jan. 1, 2008, will meet the California Air Resources Board clean-idle standards.

Those standards require manufacturers to have either tamper-proof and non-programmable idle shutdown timers or engines that produce less than 30 grams of nitrogen oxide, or NOx per hour.

The 2008 Cummins engines produce less NOx qualifying them to be certified, company officials said. The regulations allow such engines to idle indefinitely, according to a Cummins press statement. Cummins officials said this as an advantage to single drivers who currently idle for cab climate control and to produce electricity to power “hotel loads.”

Also, Cummins officials announced that the company’s ComfortGuard auxiliary power units will meet CARB regulations requiring APUs and generators to have either stand-alone diesel particulate filters on APU diesel engines or to route the APU exhaust through the DPF of the engine. Cummins will make both options available.

No urea needed
Cummins officials also dropped a bombshell on the diesel engine industry, announcing that their ISM and ISX engines will meet 2010 emissions standards without the need for separate after-treatment for NOx.

To date, other engine manufacturers have said their strategies will use catalytic reduction to convert nitrogen oxides to nitrogen and oxygen, the major components of air. That strategy requires the use of urea, commonly used in Europe to meet the latest European standards. It calls for the purchase of a second liquid when fueling and the hardware associated with urea storage and injection.

Cummins will meet the 2010 standards using their High Pressure Common Rail fuel system, next-generation cooled exhaust gas recirculation, advanced electronic controls, air handling with their variable geometry turbocharger and the Cummins Particulate Filter. No urea or its associated equipment will be needed. They also announced that it will introduce an 11.9-liter and a 16-liter engine to complement the current 15-liter ISX.

– By Paul Abelson, senior technical editor
truckwriter@anet.com

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