No damages to California bridges after quake

| Wednesday, July 30, 2008

California officials say Tuesday’s earthquake near Los Angeles caused no apparent damage to bridges, roads or rail lines.

The Associated Press quoted a Caltrans official as saying overpasses and roads with 25 miles of the quake’s epicenter were checked first and that no cracks or other significant damage was found.

However, police did get calls yesterday from motorists concerned about an apparent gap on a connector bridge off the 91 Freeway, only to be assured that the gap was actually just an expansion joint.

The earthquake measuring 5.4 in magnitude prompted Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to call for bridges and infrastructure to undergo inspections.

The earthquake struck at 11:42 a.m., Tuesday, July 29, in the Chino Hills area of Los Angeles. No deaths or severe injuries were reported, but the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services took immediate action.

“Our Office of Emergency Services also has reached out to local agencies today to make sure that the levees and bridges and other critical infrastructure are being inspected and that they are declared safe,” Schwarzenegger stated during a press conference.

“This earthquake reminds us yet once again that in California we have to be prepared for anything and everything.”

California Emergency Services Director Henry Renteria said the region has experienced as many as 30 aftershocks.

“And again, as the governor stated, there have been no major injuries reported, no major loss of infrastructure or major structural damage, although we do have teams out right now that are inspecting all the major roadways, our power lines, infrastructure, our hospitals and vulnerable populations and all of the things that we normally do after these types of events,” Renteria stated at the governor’s press conference.

The earthquake has occurred at a time when resources are already tapped fighting wildfires.

“There are currently dozens of fires that are actively threatening life and property,” officials stated on the agency’s Web site.

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