Truck driver training association warns of recruiter scam

By Clarissa Hawes, Land Line staff writer | Wednesday, April 23, 2014

A trade association representing truck driver training schools is warning the trucking industry of a recent scam targeting students enrolled in some of its schools.

Cindy Atwood, vice president of the Commercial Vehicle Training Association, told Land Line on Tuesday, April 22, that a man identifying himself as Larry Davis has been calling truck driving schools. According to the scam alert that was sent out on April 21, he then is “gleaning names of students from the school.”

For the past two weeks, Davis has been contacting the students, promising them a trainer if they wire him $200. She said that once the money is sent, the students are left with empty promises because the man, posing this time as a recruiter for Knight Transportation, disappears.

“It’s a sad situation for these students who are told that for $200 he (Davis) will help them start this incredible career, but then they are left with nothing,” Atwood said.
 
She said she isn’t sure of the exact number of students that have fallen victim to the latest scam, just that several have reported similar incidences involving the fake recruiter.

“At least one of the students in Florida has filed a police report,” the recent scam alert states. “We wanted to get the word out to all to be aware. There is no Mr. Davis at Knight and they do not charge students.”

Atwood said this isn’t the first time truck driver training schools have been targeted in similar schemes. In the past 10 years, she said she has received approximately 20 scam alerts per year.

She said CVTA works with truck driving schools, motor carriers and others in the industry to make sure word gets out as quickly as possible about a potential scam. While the association has contacted federal officials, including the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, to investigate these types of scams, so far no one has been caught.

“They use phone numbers that can’t be tracked. Once they have the money, they throw away the phone and get a new number,” Atwood said. “It’s just wrong.”

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