Line One
Roses & Razzberries

By Terry Scruton

 

It’s not often we get a request for ROSES for an attorney, so you can bet we’re going to jump at the chance when we get it.

Land Line reader John Alford of Spokane, WA, sends out a bouquet of ROSES to attorney-at-law Anna Cutler, who runs a small legal office in Spokane.

Alford, who is an out-of-work truck driver, said that Anna has done a lot of work on behalf of truckers. Alford said the company he worked for didn’t treat its experienced drivers very well – instead opting for a fleet of trainees because they cost less.

Cutler wrote letters on behalf of Alford and other drivers and helped them deal with this unfortunate situation. It’s refreshing to see a lawyer actually helping truckers instead of trying to sue them into oblivion.

OOIDA member Virgil Kempenaar of Hermitage, TN, sends out a bunch of RAZZBERRIES to a company – we won’t name it here, but let’s just say it wouldn’t be smart to take your pet there – for the way it treats truck drivers.

Virgil said he was at one of this company’s warehouses recently making a delivery and was told it was company policy that truck drivers are not allowed to use the warehouse restrooms. What’s more, there were no portable toilets or other facilities available for the truckers to use.

At this particular warehouse, Virgil said there wasn’t even a gas station close by. Sadly, this isn’t the first time we’ve heard about something like this.

Well, Virgil, all we can say is, they’re used to dealing with pets. Maybe they expected you to lift your leg on a tree.

Some roadside RAZZBERRIES go out to the Massachusetts state trooper who was less than helpful to a couple who were driving in the breakdown lane on their way to the hospital to deliver a baby.

Jennifer Davis had the misfortune to go into labor during rush hour. When she and her husband, John, found themselves in bumper-to-bumper traffic, they headed for the breakdown lane in hopes of making it to the hospital on time. Twice they encountered state troopers, and both times were told to go ahead, but to keep their hazard lights on.

The third time they saw a state trooper, they stopped to ask him if it was OK to keep using the breakdown lane. Not only did he say it was not OK, but he also proceeded to write them a $100 ticket for using the lane. Oh, and he made them wait while he finished writing someone else’s ticket before he even started on theirs.

Fortunately, the couple still made it to the hospital in time to deliver a healthy baby girl, but no thanks to this careless copper.

Guess he forgot about the “serve” part of “To Protect and Serve.”

OOIDA member John Bryant of Hillsboro, OR, would like to send some ROSES to the folks at all of the truck stops who have the unfortunate task of having to clean the showers.

John said they don’t have a very prestigious job and, for the most part, they do a great job of cleaning the showers and having them ready for the next driver. He added that it is refreshing to start out in a nice, clean shower after a long day out on the road.

So hats off to those folks who do that thankless job. And if anyone knows about thankless jobs, it’s truck drivers.

OOIDA member Ken Williams of Anderson, IN, would like to give a “big, extra-large, heaping load” of RAZZBERRIES filled with thorns to the driver who chose to use his truck as a restroom and leave his bag of, ahem, refuse on the ground at the Nestle Plant in Anderson.

Ken said the restrooms at the Nestle plant are the cleanest he’s ever seen and are available to any driver, so there is no excuse for such behavior.

You’re absolutely right, Ken. It’s drivers like this who give the whole profession a bad name. Especially when we get drivers who complain all the time about not being allowed to use the facilities at some warehouses.

Hey, here’s an idea – maybe this driver can switch routes with Virgil Kempenaar and make his deliveries to that pet company. At least there they expect this sort of thing. LL

 

Terry Scruton may be reached at
terry_scruton@landlinemag.com

 
March/April
Digital Edition