Features
State Legislative Guide
This year's legislative activities are certain to be especially critical to the way you conduct your trucking business. Don't sit on the sidelines.
Got Game?
You can't score if you're not in the game

This year’s legislative activities are certain to be especially critical to the way you conduct your trucking business. Efforts likely to receive attention in state legislatures across the country include highway tolls, privatization, transportation funding, fees and fuel taxes, to name a few.

You can have a powerful influence on the decisions lawmakers make.

Are you ready to be a player?

Most state lawmakers will be back to work by the time you are reading this. Here are four easy steps to follow to make your concerns known to those who shape your state laws.

If you don’t know who your elected officials are or how to contact them, OOIDA members can call the Association’s Membership Department at 1-800-444-5791, Ext. 4906, and they’ll look it up for you.

You can monitor OOIDA’s and Land Line’s Web sites at ooida.com and landlinemag.com, or tune in to “Land Line Now” on XM Satellite Radio for updates on legislative action in your state. For in-depth coverage and a state-by-state accounting of action that relates to your business, read “State Update” in every issue of Land Line Magazine.

For a chronological status report on key legislation in your state, visit ooida.com or landlinemag.com, click on “Legislative Watch,” and then select the state you are interested in.

Don’t sit on the sidelines. Contact your elected officials and express your concerns.

If you become aware of a new law being proposed in your home state that would affect trucking, call Land Line Magazine at 1-800-444-5791 and ask State Legislative Editor Keith Goble to place it on the Association’s watch list. You can also e-mail Keith at keith_goble@landlinemag.com. LL

FAQ Q. Why do some states have “companion” bills? A. Some state legislatures require that a House or Senate bill be introduced with a companion in the other chamber. This enables both chambers to discuss legislation simultaneously. These can also be referred to as “duplicate” or “identical” bills.

March/April
Digital Edition