Line One
Roses & Razzberries

Land Line reader and former trucker Todd Hill, who currently owns Hill and Son Tire Service, Memphis, TN, gives aRAZZBERRY to KIX 106 FM radio for running a segment the station called “The Stupid Trucker Report.”

ROSE to Henry J. Barten, who wrote The Gainesville Sun to express opposition to comments by G.B. Richards, who had written, “polite truckdrivers are a thing of the past.” Barten’s reply: “The number of impolite truckdrivers, if any, are greatly exceeded by the number of impolite automobile drivers who avoid highway patrol cars, weave in and out of traffic, make turns without using directional signals, play loud music with their windows open and hang their arms out of the window (which might be the signal for a right or left turn, but usually is not).”

ROSE to Flying J Regional Manager Richard Day, Kansas City, MO, for turning a bad experience into a good one. OOIDA members Cheryl Bice, her daughter and husband, Jeffery, Wahoo, NE, recently traveled to Kansas City to buy a truck. Cheryl and her daughter left the truck lot and entered the nearby Flying J to buy some grease. According to Cheryl, “The whole time we were in the store, the security guard followed my daughter and just stared at her. When she went to the car to wait for me, he followed her and continued to just ogle her.” When Cheryl arrived, she said the guard held the car door and said she’d be arrested and taken to jail if she entered the lot. Meanwhile, he allowed another car to enter the lot. When Cheryl informed the guard her husband was in the lot with his new truck, he said he didn’t care, and repeated his jail time threat. Manager Day later assured Cheryl in writing that the security guard will no longer be allowed to work on Flying J property, and if there were other problems, Flying J would not use the same security company. “We feel like we were being judged and treated as the proverbial lot lizards, and it was very embarrassing,” Cheryl said.

OOIDA member Ray Robinson, Naples, FL, gives a RAZZBERRY to the presiding judge at the Fort Myers, FL, County Courthouse. The judge recently fined Ray $300 and added three points to his CDL for an improper lane change on a two-lane section of I-75 four miles south of Fort Myers. Ray brought his driving record to court, which showed no infractions the past 10 years. He said the judge told him he wasn’t interested in his past record. He said Ray wasn’t supposed to drive in the left lane, adding he should always stay in the right lane, even if the right-lane traffic is only doing 45 mph. However, Ray pointed out to the judge there are no left-lane restrictions on that section of road in Fort Myers. Meanwhile, he’s hired a lawyer and will appeal the judge’s decision.

OOIDA member Tim Procise, Lanett, AL, gives a RAZZBERRY to the Perlis Travel Plaza, Cusseta, AL. Tim’s been going to the center since 1974 and done plenty of business with a nearby outlet store Perlis owns. On Memorial Day, Tim noticed a flat tire as he readied to deliver insulation equipment. However, he was told he’d have to pay double to repair the tire because the employees were being paid double to work on a holiday. But when asked, the mechanic said he was being paid the same as always.

Land Line reader Dustin Lowdermilk stopped his truck June 14 at the K&T Truck Stop off of I-77 in Princeton, WV, to get some air after noticing a flat tire. He’s a U.S. mail contractor. The only mechanic on duty was finishing another trucker’s trailer tire and said he’d help in a few minutes. Dustin tells the rest of the story: “He finished up the trailer tire on the other truck, then the phone rang ... He told me he would be back in 30 minutes to an hour and left! I asked if he would fill up my tire before he left, but he didn’t acknowledge me and just took off in his service truck.” Dustin ended up driving another 90 minutes, hoping the tire would not separate from the wheel, before finding air. “This just aggravated me to no end,” he said. “The mechanic deserves a RAZZBERRY.”

—by Dick Larsen, senior editor

Dick Larsen can be reached at dlarsen@landlinemag.com.

March/April
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