Line One
Marriage in the Long Run
Trucking wives offer wit and wisdom

Time alone... ahhh... how many of us have the luxury to waste an hour or two doing whatever we want to do? For most women married to over-the-road truckers, we know how rare this pleasure can be.

In the last column, we mentioned some ways you can squeeze in your own personal time. A few more suggestions have been received, so I will pass these along to you.

Kim, from Michigan sympathizes with moms who have preschool-aged children, but, for those who can send their kids off to school, she admits, "I think we all breathe a sigh of relief when fall comes around."

A few of Kim's suggestions for parents with toddlers can be helpful. She proposes that mom nap when the baby does, then stay up later at night for quiet time. To make it even more special, have your husband time his calls for that designated free time so you can concentrate on him and your marriage.

One other point the reader made was to choose stores and activities that offer childcare. If your YMCA has a day care, take advantage of it and go for a swim or a walk.

One other suggestion for time alone came from a woman in Florida. She writes that her husband takes the kids with him in the truck on short trips. If your spouse is willing to do this, take advantage of it and let him be the parent for a few days. Remember that this doesn't work for everyone and many carriers do not allow children in the trucks, so think about how this would work for you.

In the last issue, we promised to discuss how women married to over-the-road drivers can fight the extra pounds accumulated when he's gone. Rose is a truckdriver's wife from Pennsylvania. She has been working to get rid of the weight she gained ". due to loneliness, stress . I just ate myself to death," she writes. Rose has used her talents and her story to design a web site chronicling her efforts. If you have access to the Internet, you can check it out at http://members.tripod.com/~rrakt/index.html. She was wondering if any readers were interested in forming a support group for those struggling with their weight.

Although it's been said that half the nation is overweight, it seems to be more common with women married to truckdrivers. As Rose mentioned, it could be the loneliness we endure, maybe it's a feeling of isolation or for some of us, it's just boredom. Whatever your reason for overeating, you know it's not good for you.

This column isn't intended to offer diet tips. We know that we should exercise and reduce our sugar and fat intake. But what we don't know is how to counter whatever it is that makes us put immediate pleasure before our long-term physical health. You need to understand your triggers.

If you down a quart of ice cream after an argument with your husband, then next time instead of heading for the freezer, lace up your tennis shoes and take a walk. If you eat when you are watching television at night, then turn off the boob tube and play games with your kids. How about those doughnuts your co-workers bring to the office? Turn one down and watch the others admire you for your willpower.

If you are having a problem keeping those pounds from adding up, then find a friend who is willing to assist you in your efforts. When you promise to meet for a walk in the park, you're less likely to forget it if someone is waiting. You can go to Rose's web site and see what she has accomplished, and how she has begun to get the weight off. She'd love to hear from you. LL

 If you have any other advice, or stories to tell us about your own weight victories, write or e-mail me at OOIDA@aol.com or Land Line Magazine, P. O. Box L, Grain Valley, MO 64029. We'll keep your identity to ourselves, but include your name for credibility. Thanks, and keep writing.

March/April
Digital Edition